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Transportation

Transportation plays a key role in making UNC a more sustainable campus by reducing the impacts of both staff/student commutes and campus operations.  UNC has been awarded the Best Workplace for Commuters designation from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency each year since 2002. According to a 2007 transportation survey, 44 percent of University and Hospital employees and 83 percent of off-campus students arrive on campus via a means other than a single-occupant vehicle. Employees commute an average of 14 miles to campus and students an average of seven miles. The 9,000 students who live on campus avoid the need to commute altogether.

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Fare-Free Transit

A bus stop on campusSince fare-free transit for the entire community was implemented in 2002, bus ridership has more than doubled from 3 million to 7.5 million trips annually. Per capita bus ridership is among the highest in the country. In 2009, the Town of Chapel Hill was recognized as the Most Livable Small City in the country by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, in large part because of the bus system. The University contributes more than $6 million annually, or 60 percent of total local costs, to support Chapel Hill Transit in partnership with the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro.

UNC has committed to making Carolina North accessible as well.  Plans have been completed for a 3.25 mile campus-to-campus connector, selected for its low cost, flat topography, and convenient location.  The Chapel Hill Town Council and the Carrboro Board of Aldermen have added the project to  their priority lists for the 2014-2020 NCDOT Statewide Transportation Improvement Program.

Links:
Chapel Hill Transit - http://www.ci.chapel-hill.nc.us/index.aspx?page=1175

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Commuter Alternatives Program

A bicycle commuterParticipation in UNC’s Commuter Alternatives Program (CAP), increased to 7,602 members in FY 2009, more than double the number enrolled in FY 2004. Members pledge to arrive on campus via a means other than a singleoccupant vehicle. Ten park and ride lots provide 3,800 free parking spaces conveniently located along bus routes approaching campus from all directions. Chapel Hill Transit buses are equipped with bike racks for those who want wheels at their destination.

CAP participants are eligible to receive emergency rides home, complimentary annual bus passes from Triangle Transit, discounts from local merchants, and a voucher to park on campus once a month. CAP members also receive subsidies for participating in vanpools, preferential parking for carpools, and discounted hourly parking in the Rams Head parking deck.CAP members save at least $500 annually—depending on location and pay scale—by not buying a parking permit. And the University avoids the cost of constructing new parking spaces that start at a minimum of $20,000 per space.

Links:
Commuter Alternative Program website - Click Here »

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Campus Vehicles

An electric-powered vehiclePetroleum consumption at Carolina has fallen 18 percent since FY 2005. In FY 2008, Facilities Services installed a 4,000-gallon tank to store an 85 percent ethanol/15 percent gasoline blend (E85). Now one pump at the fuel station dispenses E85 and the other dispenses E10, a blend of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent ethanol. The University owns 113 flex-fuel trucks and cargo vans that can run on either gasoline or E-85 fuel, and leases another 167 flex-fuel passenger cars from N.C.’s Motor Fleet Management. When fueling up on campus, all 280 flex-fuel vehicles run exclusively on E-85 fuel.

Increased consumption of 20 percent biodiesel fuel, and switching to synthetic motor oil, have also contributed to the decline in petroleum use. The Point to Point bus fleet that circulates around campus at night runs on B20 fuel and is funded through the student transit fee.

Purchasing more fuel efficient vehicles, incorporating 19 street-legal electric vehicles into the housekeeping, grounds, and maintenance fleets, and relying more on “zone shops” also resulted in savings. Zone shops are distributed strategically across campus and reduce travel back and forth to Facilities Services’ main complex for both parts and personnel.

Not purchasing vehicles also reduces costs and environmental impacts.  In addition to Motor Pool vehicles available to departments and organizations, the ZipCar on-demand car rental program is now self-supporting and includes 735 individual and three dozen departmental members with 5 cars located across campus.

Links:
Point to Point - http://www.dps.unc.edu/Transit/campustransit/p2p/p2p.cfm
Motor Pool - http://www.fac.unc.edu/
ZipCar - http://www.dps.unc.edu/Transit/campustransit/zipcar/zipcar.pdf

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