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Carolina in the News

  

Fri, 24 Jan 2014 16:54:00 +0000

Check out the recent media mentions of sustainability-related programs, practices, and people at UNC:

Carolina is #1 academic value among public campuses for 13th time in a row 
Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ranks as the number one value in American public higher education for the 13th consecutive year. UNC’s combination of stellar academics, low cost, and generous financial aid has once again bested its peers. For academic quality, UNC competes with elite private schools. Its 28% admission rate—even more selective than last year’s—means that only the most competitive applicants gain entry. Most students graduate on time, with 77% completing their degrees in four years. UNC is the only school on the list to meet 100% of financial need. Read more »

Researchers project N.C. ‘megalopolis’ by 2050 
wral.com 
North Carolina is expected to grow by at least a million people a decade for the next few decades, and researchers are beginning to get a sense of where they're all going to end up. Rebecca Tippett, with the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says it’s projected that, by 2050, there will be a megalopolis – defined as an area that includes several large cities – along the Charlotte, Triad, and Triangle corridor. Researchers at UNC believe city and county planners need to come together to best decide how they want this potential mega-region to look decades from now. Read more »

UNC researchers convert solar energy into fuel 
wunc 91.5 North Carolina Public Radio
The Energy Frontier Research Center at UNC-Chapel Hill has built a system that converts solar energy into fuel, so power can be used even after the sun sets. Instead of storing solar electricity in an expensive battery, researchers use the sun's energy to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. Chemistry Professor Tom Meyer says the method could be useful and cost-effective for power utilities someday. Read more »

Thanks to UNC News Services for finding these great stories AND compiling the summaries! You can find more UNC media coverage and stories online at http://uncnews.unc.edu.


Tue, 26 Nov 2013 15:41:00 +0000

Check out the recent media mentions of sustainability-related programs, practices, and people at UNC: 

Report: Polluted farm runoff linked to toxic green algae slime in U.S. waters 
The Washington Post 
Toxic algae is the byproduct of the same types of pollution that causes dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay — phosphorous and nitrogen from livestock manure and chemicals sprayed on crops that spills from farms into waterways during moderate to heavy rains. The effects of polluted runoff are made worse by the changing climate, said Hans Paerl, professor of marine and environmental sciences at the University of North Carolina. “Global warming and intensification of major storms and droughts play major roles in the spread of toxic blue-green algal blooms worldwide.” Read more »

Green energy pays for itself in lives saved from smog 
New Scientist
Switching to clean energy might seem like the expensive option, but it would pay for itself almost immediately, according to a new analysis. By 2050, 1.3 million early deaths could be avoided every year by switching to clean energy. From estimates of how much society values a human life, researchers deduce that new energy supplies should be worth the cost. "The work strengthens the case for these new regulations by pointing out the air quality and health benefits," says Jason West at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who led the analysis. Read more »

Thanks to UNC News Services for finding these great stories AND compiling the summaries! You can find more UNC media coverage and stories online at http://uncnews.unc.edu.


Fri, 16 Aug 2013 14:52:00 +0000

Check out the recent media mentions of sustainability-related programs, practices, and people at UNC: 

Even sharks no match for invasive lionfish 
NBC News 
It was once thought that natural predators, such as sharks and groupers, could curb lionfish populations by eating or out-competing them for food. A new study shows that this is not the case. “Lionfish are here to stay and it appears that the only way to control them is by fishing them,” said John Bruno, professor of biology in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences and lead investigator of the study. The research has important implications not just for Caribbean reefs, but for the North Carolina coast, where growing numbers of lionfish now threaten local fish populations. First introduced to the Atlantic Ocean by humans, this invasive species has no real predators in the Atlantic. Authorities from Florida to the Bahamas have started organizing fishing derbies as a way to control the lionfish population. Read more »

Hurricane warning system gets boost from UNC-Chapel Hill computer center 
News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) 
Coastal communities will be better informed during hurricane seasons, thanks to a storm-modeling computer program at UNC-Chapel Hill. The Renaissance Computing Institute, known as RENCI, is offering detailed storm-surge data in a format that allows local emergency managers to create their own customized analysis of incoming hurricanes, nor’easters and other weather events, said Brian Blanton, senior scientist and oceanographer at UNC. The Surge Guidance System uses real-time weather conditions, ocean circulation patterns, and wave height to evaluate storm-surge impacts along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. “The typical way you assess storm surge is to look at a big region, but the true nature of the coastline and tidal inlets can have a big impact on how storm surge is going to develop in a specific location,” says Brian Blanton, senior scientist and oceanographer at UNC. Read more »

Worldwide air pollution deaths per year number over 2 million, new study claims 
The Huffington Post 
A new study estimates that 2.1 million deaths each year are linked with fine particulate matter, tiny particles that can get deep into the lungs and cause health problems. Exposure to particle pollution has been linked to early death from heart and lung disease, including lung cancer. "Air pollution is an important problem. It's probably one of the most important environmental risk factors for health," said Jason West, an assistant professor of environmental science at the University of North Carolina and lead study coauthor. The study also found that 470,000 deaths yearly are linked with human sources of ozone, which forms when pollutants from sources such as cars or factories come together and react. Read more »

UNC documentary nominated for Emmy 
The Herald Sun (Durham, NC) 
UNC’s Powering a Nation journalism project, “100 Gallons: How Water Powers Life,” a multimedia documentary about water conservation, has been nominated for an Emmy Award. Available online, the documentary includes videos of everyday experiences with water. “We wanted to create a universal appeal, where you see people of all ages and all backgrounds interacting with water. That was our hook to get people to think about how critical water is to life,” says Josh Davis, the managing editor and video producer on the project, who graduated from UNC in 2012. Read more »

N.C.’s Southern Cricket Frog populations declining 
Phys.org 
Jonathan Micancin, a researcher and visiting lecturer with UNC’s Biology Department, has found that the Southern Cricket Frog has been disappearing from the upper coastal plains of North Carolina. “We don’t know yet why this is happening, but we can expect that it does not bode well for amphibians and other animals that share their habitats, including humans,” Micancin said. Some theories for the decline include development impacts on fragile habitats or the inability to survive drought or winter temperature weather conditions. The decline of the Southern Cricket Frog mirrors a disturbing national trend of amphibians disappearing at alarming rates. Read more »

Thanks to UNC News Services for finding these great stories AND compiling the summaries! You can find more UNC media coverage and stories online at http://uncnews.unc.edu.


Wed, 10 Jul 2013 16:29:00 +0000

Check out the recent media mentions of sustainability-related programs, practices, and people at UNC: 

Tax incentives for GE expansion a win-win 
Star News (Wilmington, NC) 
GE Aviation is investing $195 million to expand four facilities in North Carolina and add 240 jobs by 2017. GE Aviation’s investment will help secure North Carolina’s future as an aerospace manufacturing hub. John Kasarda, director of the Center for Air Commerce at UNC–Chapel Hill, commented that these advanced materials manufacturing sites “are the leading sectors, the fastest-growing parts of the industry.” “They are cutting edge, and I think it bodes well for the future of the aerospace business in North Carolina.” Read more » 

Thanks to UNC News Services for finding these great stories AND compiling the summaries! You can find more UNC media coverage and stories online at http://uncnews.unc.edu.


Mon, 17 Jun 2013 18:26:00 +0000

Check out the recent media mentions of sustainability-related programs, practices, and people at UNC:

Breathing easier: how Houston is working to clean up its air 
National Public Radio
The Houston area produces about a quarter of the nation's gasoline, and about a third of the plastics that are in our cars, cupboards and just about everywhere else. So it is no surprise that this heavily industrial area has a problem with air pollution. But in the past decade, Houston's air has improved dramatically. Harvey Jeffries, Professor Emeritus with the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, explains that Houston air pollution regulators were going all-in against one of the pollutants that create smog, while downplaying the role of other emissions from the petrochemical plants. …Beginning in 2005, when new standards went into effect, peak ozone concentrations started dropping sharply. And in 2009, Houston — for the first time in 35 years — met the federal air quality smog standard, Jeffries says. Read more »

1789 incubator fosters young entrepreneurs
WCHL-FM (Chapel Hill)
1789 is the newest business incubator to open in Chapel Hill. It’s geared towards Carolina students and recent graduates, with the goal of supporting the area’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. Following in the footsteps of Launch Chapel Hill, 1789 aims to develop young entrepreneurs and assist them in the early stages of their business ventures. 1789 currently hosts 15 start-ups. Successful entrepreneurs may then proceed to Launch, which nurtures more advanced businesses ready to seek funding. Read more »

Thanks to UNC News Services for finding these great stories AND compiling the summaries! You can find more UNC media coverage and stories online at http://uncnews.unc.edu.


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